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Conversation with Edith Schultz:  POW & Refugee in WWII Poland

Conversation with Edith Schultz: POW & Refugee in WWII Poland

Edith Schultz

On Thursday, June 22nd the Richard I Bong Veterans Historical Center will host Edith Schultz, 94, who will speak about her childhood in Poland and how her life was impacted by World War II.

Bong Center volunteer and oral history interviewer Clint Mattson will facilitate a conversation with Edith that will explore her life both before and after the outbreak of WWII. Her father went into hiding before eventually being drafted into the German Army. Edith and her mother moved throughout Europe in an effort to flee the chaos around them.

“It was a terrible time that January of 1945. My hometown was bombed by the Russians and trains going west were packed with people trying to flee. We were all escaping with our bare lives and had only what was on our backs”, said Schultz.

From Poland to Germany to Czechoslovakia, Edith finally wound up in a Russian POW camp at the end of the war.

Join us to hear more about her story as well as her life after the war when she married a U.S. soldier and moved to Wisconsin. She worked as a lab and x-ray technician for 30 years at Giesen Clinic in Superior. Later in life she became a competitive swimmer in the Senior Olympics and in April 2017 was inducted into the Wisconsin Senior Olympics Hall of Fame.

Join us on June 22nd at 6:30 p.m. to hear Edith’s fascinating life story.

Refreshments will be provided.

The Mission of the Richard I. Bong Veterans Historical Center is to preserve and honor the memory of Major Bong and all veterans of World War II, as well as subsequent conflicts and to provide educational resources for the Twin Ports area community and beyond.

Middle School Essay Contest Winners

Middle School Essay Contest Winners

Washburn Essay Winners & Education  Outreach Coordinator John Gidley

Richard I. Bong Veterans Historical Center is proud to announce the winners of the 2016-17 Middle School Essay contest. Students were asked to answer the question “How do the new technologies and inventions created during World War II affect or shape our lives today?”

“The response was overwhelming, all the students did a great job” said John Gidley, Education and Outreach Coordinator for the Center. “It was so hard to narrow it down to just three winners.”
The winners were chosen from 100 essays that were submitted from Northern Wisconsin and Northern Minnesota. The winners received a $50 cash prize, 4 admissions to the Center and an “American’s Ace of Aces” book by General George C. Kenny.

2016-17 Middle School Essay Contest” winners are:
-Sorley Swanstrom-Arnold, Grade 8, Washburn Middle School, Washburn Wisconsin.
-Sarah Earing, Grade 7, Washburn Middle School, Washburn Wisconsin
-Sebastian Rosales, Grade 7, Washburn Middle School, Washburn Wisconsin

Honorable mentions are:
-Jack Broadmore, Grade 6, Ordean East Middle School, Duluth Minnesota
-Lily Wheeler, Grade 7, Washburn Middle School, Washburn Wisconsin
-Collin Krmpotich, Grade 7, NorthStar Community Charter School, Minong Wisconsin
-Meghan Dougherty, Grade 8, Washburn Middle School, Washburn Wisconsin

The Mission of the Richard I. Bong Veterans Historical Center is to preserve and honor the memory of Major Bong and all veterans of World War II, as well as subsequent conflicts and to provide educational resources for the Twin Ports area community and beyond.

World War II Shipbuilding in Duluth and Superior Book Signing and Program

World War II Shipbuilding in Duluth and Superior Book Signing and Program

On May 25th the Richard I Bong Veterans Historical Center will host local author Gerald Sandvick and his new book, World War II Shipbuilding in Duluth and Superior. It is the newest addition to Arcadia Publishing’s popular Images of America series.

World War II hinged on the Allies having enough ships to both fight the enemy and to carry millions of tons of war goods across the world’s oceans. Shipyards on the Atlantic, Gulf, and Pacific Coasts built thousands of vessels, but America’s sometimes forgotten Fourth Coast, the Great Lakes, built hundreds of ships as well.

From 1940 to 1945, warships, cargo haulers, Coast Guard tenders, and fleet service auxiliaries of many types were launched from the Twin Ports. Half a dozen shipyards in Duluth-Superior produced more than 200 vessels of 10 main types, up to 338 feet long and 5,000 tons, all having to make close to a 2,400-mile journey to the ocean.

The shipyards grew from nearly nothing in 1939 to become industries employing thousands of men and women by 1945 and making a major contribution to the story of America in World War II.

Join us on May 25th at 6:30 p.m. in celebrating the book’s publication with an author program followed by a book signing.

Refreshments will be provided.
The Mission of the Richard I. Bong Veterans Historical Center is to preserve and honor the memory of Major Bong and all veterans of World War II, as well as subsequent conflicts and to provide educational resources for the Twin Ports area community and beyond.